ad

ad

PC Pitstop Videos
* Vista: 4 Months Later (3:10)

Rob's Vista Migration Update

* Way of the Upgrade (2:03)

Video Contest Winner

* Apples 2 Apples (5:50)

PC vs. Mac - Who wins?

* Bloatware (5:04)

Is your PC feeling a bit bloated?

* H.D. Freedom II (4:33)

When is the hard drive in your new PC not your own?

* Hard Drive Freedom (5:22)

Rob documents his crusade to reclaim his hard drive space.

* Vista Migration (5:20)

Rob shares his experience migrating from XP to Vista.

* Firefox Conversion (2:10)

Rob outlines Firefox features that compelled him to stop using IE.

* Software Stocks (4:56)

An inside look at the software industry.

* Laptop Explosion (4:55)

What's a notebook battery fire? 6 foot flames, 1000 degree temperatures.

XP to Vista: A Worthwhile Migration?

In this new video, Rob shares the ups & downs of migrating one system from XP to Vista.


Join the Discussion
badbinary: Vista Migration - Video Report (Fri, 06 Jul 2007 00:02:20 GMT)
QUOTE(KRAM @ 6:10am Mon Apr 30 2007) [snapback]1360551[/snapback]

Another thing. When I had Vista on my system I had my account as Admin status and my daughter was limited user and did not know admin password. She did manage to install some kind of picture editing program that not only wrote to her account, but did this system wide and even put a startup file in my account which placed an icon in the system tray when I logged in. I do tend to agree with dark41 on not letting yourself fall into a false sense of security with Vista.


you can tweak the user settings and parental control settings. my children don't have the ability to either download or install anything without my or my wife's password being entered.
badbinary: Vista Migration - Video Report (Fri, 06 Jul 2007 00:00:36 GMT)
QUOTE(KRAM @ 5:36am Mon Apr 30 2007) [snapback]1360544[/snapback]

This is something I never liked. Not sure if Vista is this way. I had Vista RC1 on my system then removed it and chucked the DVD in the trash so I can't check this, but with Windows XP the first user you setup is automatically an Administrator account and can not be set to limited user. You have to create another user with admin status to change it. Really silly as there is a user account called Administrator installed by default, but you can't use it unless in safe mode. I'm pretty sure Vista is the same as XP.


you can log in with the admin account in xp outside of safe mode. hit ctrl-alt-del-del, type in administrator.
Makeshift: Vista Migration - Video Report (Thu, 05 Jul 2007 22:57:02 GMT)
I just got a laptop a month ago and the big reason why I bought it was because it had XP on it!! I found it at Circuit City and was overjoyed. I have no intention of switching to Vista anytime soon and don't think XP was broken in the first place. So what if Vista has Malware and Spyware protection built into it. I have never had trouble with that stuff to begin with and you can put third party utilities by legions of developers on XP anyway. I have Spybot, X-cleaner, SpywareBlaster and Ad-aware all on my PC and it's doing great. I also clean out the registry all the time.

All I hear about Vista is how many problems it has running most of the software out there. I plan to get it in about a year and even then I will do so only by buying a second hard drive and installing it separately. I will retain my XP media center hard drive. That way I'll have both OSs. Only the "jump on the latest bandwagon" people can't resist getting a new OS right away. And they do so only because it's the thing to do, not because they actually need to. I kept my Win98SE on my desktop for ages after XP came out and was glad I did. It took a while before XP was a good OS.

Resist the "me too" syndrome and don't switch to the newest thing simply for the sake of switching or because everyone else is. People act like teenagers a lot and let peer pressure get to them. I for one will change only when I'm ready. "Oh my God, everybody is going to Vista, you'd better too of you'll be left behind!" Yeah, right, whatever...........it reminds me of mass hyteria or something. If you aren't having problems with XP, why temp fate??
emichelle: Vista Migration - Video Report (Tue, 01 May 2007 15:08:55 GMT)
QUOTE(cmunson @ 10:42am Tue Apr 10 2007) [snapback]1350888[/snapback]


I am responding to the issue you are having with your active printer. I had the same problem when I first got this computer running Vista, and it took me a few minutes to figure out what I needed to do. I opened up 'printers', added my Canon printer, and was good to go. It opens my Canon printer every time now as my default printer, which is great, because I thought I was going to have to go through the process EVERY time.

Good luck with that.

Michelle
KRAM: Vista Migration - Video Report (Mon, 30 Apr 2007 11:10:20 GMT)
Another thing. When I had Vista on my system I had my account as Admin status and my daughter was limited user and did not know admin password. She did manage to install some kind of picture editing program that not only wrote to her account, but did this system wide and even put a startup file in my account which placed an icon in the system tray when I logged in. I do tend to agree with dark41 on not letting yourself fall into a false sense of security with Vista.
KRAM: Vista Migration - Video Report (Mon, 30 Apr 2007 10:36:31 GMT)
This is something I never liked. Not sure if Vista is this way. I had Vista RC1 on my system then removed it and chucked the DVD in the trash so I can't check this, but with Windows XP the first user you setup is automatically an Administrator account and can not be set to limited user. You have to create another user with admin status to change it. Really silly as there is a user account called Administrator installed by default, but you can't use it unless in safe mode. I'm pretty sure Vista is the same as XP.
Bruce: Vista Migration - Video Report (Mon, 30 Apr 2007 08:49:09 GMT)
QUOTE(dark41 @ 7:28pm Sun Apr 22 2007) [snapback]1357268[/snapback]


Try and let this sink in. I didn't give my son an administrator's account. He had UAC and Windows defender enabled and was running under his user profile, the only profile on that machine.


Try and let this sink in.

Unless you created a limited user account, then by default the only account on the machine is essentially an administrators account allowing the installation of software or malware.

All accounts should be "limited" user accounts with no install privileges.

User accounts and UAC work great if people knew how to use them, but especially would work much better if the defaults were "more" restrictive then they are.
cL1cKm3.exe: Vista Migration - Video Report (Sun, 29 Apr 2007 21:54:20 GMT)
QUOTE(dark41 @ 6:28pm Sun Apr 22 2007) [snapback]1357268[/snapback]


UAC doesn't work the way you think it does. Its easily defeated as it was with my son. Anyone silly enough to think Vista has security incorporated that will protect them from malware is in for a rude awakening. MAKE SURE YOU HAVE AV AND AT LEAST 1 ANTI-SPYWARE PROGRAM ON YOUR VISTA COMPUTER.


if i had a son who used my pc, i would use vista's parantal controls
dark41: Vista Migration - Video Report (Sun, 22 Apr 2007 23:28:54 GMT)
QUOTE(badbinary @ 4:01am Mon Apr 23 2007) [snapback]1357161[/snapback]

why on earth would you give your son an administrator account?

quite frankly, i disagree a bit with your view of the computer world. while many people will just click yes no matter what, a large portion of the people will wonder if that is a program they actually tried to run.

people like you do a grand disservice to the public by just saying disable it. if you took 10 minutes to educate them on why and how it is important, then maybe you would truly help them out.

vista is, out of the box, much safer than any other windows operating system. it's the users who cripple it that are the problem. windows defender is okay, it's not great, i also use spybot. but then again, it's NEVER good advice to only use one spyware/malware program.
that is only half-true. uac will also pop up any time kernel access is needed. this means that using uac properly will prevent any program, malware, virus, etc, from accessing the kernel, which means the worst you will ever have to do is remove a user profile from the system.

this is also true if you don't give everyone admin accounts and use good policies for those user accounts. if this is done, then uac truly wouldn't be needed.


Anyone who sees the UAC popup and wonders - but still doesn't know the difference between a valid program and malware will not know enough to say no, or will stop a legitimate program from installing and then wonder why things aren't working. Since the rest of the screen is locked until you answer, you don't even have the option to google the application to find out if its legit or not. Stupid idea. What am I going to say for 10 minutes.. call me if you don't know what it is before you allow it to install? I think not. Give me your phone number and I'll gladly have them call you.

Try and let this sink in. I didn't give my son an administrator's account. He had UAC and Windows defender enabled and was running under his user profile, the only profile on that machine. He doesn't know how to right click on the application and run as an administrator and I have no intention of showing him how. Clicking on a link in MSN Messenger (which is going around big time in AU right now and was in the USA about 6 months ago) gave him a messenger window popup flood, and installed several trojans and malware programs (Win-antivirus and others) onto his computer without ever getting a popup from UAC. Neither UAC nor Windows Defender alerted him nor prevented the app from running. Just removing a profile my butt, it took me the better part of a day to get all that stuff off without reformatting. If it had been XP, there are several removal tools that could have made it easy. But nooo.. MS had to remove the HAL from Vista making all of these tools useless.

I've said this twice now, and I'll say it once more just because you don't seem to understand what you're reading. I haven't suggested to anyone, anywhere, at any time, that they disable their UAC and/or Windows Defender. Go back and read my original post. I word things carefully only to have idiots like you twist around what I say.

I wrote "The fix for lag is to turn off search, gadgets, and set system restore to a low percentage (I use 1% because I have so much HD space). While this doesn't do much to improve the speed of apps, it does cut the lag down considerably."

In the next paragraph I wrote "I also disable UAC and Windows Defender as they're annoying and useless as far as I'm concerned."

Nowhere did I recommend to anyone else to do the same. I said that I disable mine. And if that bothers you, I can live with that. I have AVG Internet Security Suite, and CounterSpy 2 on my Vista drive. I have much more on XP because much more is available for XP. I'm well protected either way and know how to get just about any malware off my computer. I see no reason to have UAC nor Windows Defender running with my setup and my computer knowledge. Windows Defender just sits there and UAC is a constant annoyance for me. I've spent a decade taking viruses and malware off of computers before I ever went into business for myself. The rest of the world is obviously incompetent and should keep UAC and Windows Defender turned on. You're a prime example.

UAC doesn't work the way you think it does. Its easily defeated as it was with my son. Anyone silly enough to think Vista has security incorporated that will protect them from malware is in for a rude awakening. MAKE SURE YOU HAVE AV AND AT LEAST 1 ANTI-SPYWARE PROGRAM ON YOUR VISTA COMPUTER.

I guess you're feeling threatened by someone who actually knows something on here. So I'll refrain from posting on this forum. There's lots of other places for me to help those who want it. I just feel sorry for the people relying on you for help, as you obviously like to think you know more than you do. Anyone who isn't having problems with drivers and applications on Vista isn't running many applications or doing half of what a computer is capable of doing.
badbinary: Vista Migration - Video Report (Sun, 22 Apr 2007 18:31:17 GMT)
why on earth would you give your son an administrator account?

quite frankly, i disagree a bit with your view of the computer world. while many people will just click yes no matter what, a large portion of the people will wonder if that is a program they actually tried to run.

people like you do a grand disservice to the public by just saying disable it. if you took 10 minutes to educate them on why and how it is important, then maybe you would truly help them out.

vista is, out of the box, much safer than any other windows operating system. it's the users who cripple it that are the problem. windows defender is okay, it's not great, i also use spybot. but then again, it's NEVER good advice to only use one spyware/malware program.



QUOTE
The truth is that UAC doesn't stop you from installing anything on your computer. It simply pops up a window asking if you're sure you want to install every program that uses a .exe.


that is only half-true. uac will also pop up any time kernel access is needed. this means that using uac properly will prevent any program, malware, virus, etc, from accessing the kernel, which means the worst you will ever have to do is remove a user profile from the system.

this is also true if you don't give everyone admin accounts and use good policies for those user accounts. if this is done, then uac truly wouldn't be needed.
dark41: Vista Migration - Video Report (Sun, 22 Apr 2007 18:20:29 GMT)
QUOTE
My advice is always never take the advice of people who recommend disabling security measures.


Reading comprehension problem? I didn't recommend anyone turn off any security measures. I said that I turn off MS's "so called" security measures on my own system. I recommended that users turn off Windows Desktop Search, Gadgets, and reduce system restore to a realistic percentage (the default is 15%) to help reduce lag on Vista.

QUOTE(badbinary @ 11:32pm Sun Apr 22 2007) [snapback]1357058[/snapback]

yup they sure are.

that is if you think viruses, malware, spyware, and trojans are programs that SHOULD be on your computer.


I've read your posts on other topics and while you're an avid fan of UAC, you have yet to explain how it protects anything. Maybe that's because you know full well that all it does is pop up a window?

The truth is that UAC doesn't stop you from installing anything on your computer. It simply pops up a window asking if you're sure you want to install every program that uses a .exe. If a user doesn't know the difference between malware and a legitimate program, UAC sure isn't going to protect them because it doesn't either. XP does the same thing unless you check the box saying "do not ask...". If you really think UAC is going to stop viruses from email or web page scripts from installing on your computer, you'll soon find out you're wrong, as many other Vista users already have.

Neither UAC nor Windows Defender stopped my son from getting a mass of trojans and malware by clicking on a link in MSN Messenger. UAC didn't ask if it should install them either.

The only malware I've had on my computer in the past 2 years is malware that I've intentionally installed myself. I've installed several types of malware programs on one of my Vista computers purposely to test Windows Defender. It didn't find any of them. And this is why I now choose to disable it on my system. MS doesn't make AV/spyware programs for a good reason.

We remove viruses, malware, spyware, trojans and worms from customers' computers every week and Vista is no safer than any other OS without a good AV and spyware program, with or without UAC and Windows Defender.

Your best bet to prevent spyware/malware infections and to get rid of the ones you already have from relying upon Vista to protect you, is a good spyware program like CounterSpy 2 or AVG Anti-spyware 7.5 (used to be Ewido). I recommend AVG's new Internet Security Suite 7.5 for complete protection on Vista. It uses less resources and protects better than Norton, Kaspersky, McAfee and Zone Alarm. Its also a bit cheaper for a 2 year license than any of these other products. All AVG AV/spyware/firewall products have fully functional trial versions.

But then I'm just as happy if you don't take my advice, since I make a very good living off people who don't.
badbinary: Vista Migration - Video Report (Sun, 22 Apr 2007 14:02:53 GMT)
QUOTE
I also disable UAC and Windows Defender as they're annoying and useless as far as I'm concerned.


yup they sure are.

that is if you think viruses, malware, spyware, and trojans are programs that SHOULD be on your computer.
Bruce: Vista Migration - Video Report (Sun, 22 Apr 2007 10:55:34 GMT)
My advice is always never take the advice of people who recommend disabling security measures.
dark41: Vista Migration - Video Report (Sun, 22 Apr 2007 10:28:58 GMT)
QUOTE(Lord Serak @ 4:09pm Sun Apr 22 2007) [snapback]1356980[/snapback]



Well, ITS A NEW OS!! Of course its different, I'll bet you that a person who has used MS-DOS for his entire life would think XP was horrible, as for lags, your system just isn't fit to run vista on. Its not the OS's problem, its your problem.


That's not exactly true. Vista is designed to use the resources it has available. A clean install on a machine with 1gig of RAM will use roughly 300mbs of RAM to run (Windows desktop search, etc.), where a system with 2gigs of RAM will use roughly 600mbs. So roughly 30% of your memory is wasted on the OS, no matter how much or how little you have.

My specs:
Motherboard-GA 965P DQ6
CPU-E6400@2.8GHz
RAM-2x1g Crucial Ballistix PC6400
Video-Leadtek PX7900 GTX TDH Extreme
Hard Drive-2x250gig Seagate SATAII (RAID 0)
the rest of my components aren't really relevant to the speed of the OS, but as anyone can see this is a pretty high end system

I still get lag and most apps run slower than they did on XP. The problem is that Vista is a bloated OS with many features that are worthless to the average user. MS has to understand the idea that just because technology gets faster and bigger, doesn't mean that the OS has to use it all. Its the same with every manufacturer's Internet Security Suite. They slow down machines and connections up to 50%. This is a ridiculous trend that has to stop to please the bulk of users.

The fix for lag is to turn off search, gadgets, and set system restore to a low percentage (I use 1% because I have so much HD space). While this doesn't do much to improve the speed of apps, it does cut the lag down considerably.

I also disable UAC and Windows Defender as they're annoying and useless as far as I'm concerned.

While these tricks can get you running Vista more efficiently, they'll do nothing to address the driver issues that apps/games/hardware are having now. Deleting the HAL from Vista was a major step backwards at this point in time. God help you if you depend on OpenGL apps for a living.

Keep in mind that MS's next OS will have the file system that was originally planned to be in Vista. This means that all the software that you buy to work with Vista will not work with the new OS.

As a system builder who runs his own computer business, my advice is to save your $ until the next MS operating system and see if that's not more worth your hard earned dollars.
Lord Serak: Vista Migration - Video Report (Sun, 22 Apr 2007 06:39:42 GMT)
"ndlicht: Vista Migration - Video Report (Tech Talk) (Thu, 12 Apr 2007 02:39:00 GMT)
Vista is horrible! I'm adept at using a PC and Vista is not at all intuitive. What was Mr. Gates thinking when his team overhauled XP?

The icons are different, the management is different, it was even difficult to figure out how to restart or shut down.

Wireless is the last to load and it seems unable to auto find what available. You have to fiddle with settings and you will not get it right. Programs get blocked and even if you say dont block at startup, its still blocked.

Get this Vista junk off my laptop and give me back XP."

Well, ITS A NEW OS!! Of course its different, I'll bet you that a person who has used MS-DOS for his entire life would think XP was horrible, as for lags, your system just isn't fit to run vista on. Its not the OS's problem, its your problem.
badbinary: Vista Migration - Video Report (Thu, 12 Apr 2007 14:27:35 GMT)
hey, you guys, if you're having problems, we have a great help section here.
Melohawk: Vista Migration - Video Report (Thu, 12 Apr 2007 03:08:46 GMT)
[font=Comic Sans Ms][size=3]Windows Vista had me pulling my hair out until I remembered one thing, today's computers can take care of themselves when it comes to peripherals. When the HP site said that they would NEVER have a compatible driver for my new Deskjet F380 All-in-one that I just bought with my new HP Pavillion 1730 I got mad. I simply plugged the printer cable into the USB port and told it to work or else. Then, when the scanner was going to give me problems because there was no driver support to make it work I went out to the HP site and found out that as long as I can get a program to accept a TWAIN source I've got it made. Not only will Paint do this but so will Paintshop Pro. You have to fuss a bit with them but it works. The only lame part about not having a driver for my printer is that I have no way of telling when the ink is running low.....no graphic is available if there is nothing keeping track of the ink levels.

The next chore was to see if I could make an external floppy drive work with the miserable program. Yep...no driver needed, just plug it into the USB port. Then it was an external CD-G burner for my karaoke discs. If I don't back them up I'm stupid. It's too much of an investment to let the originals wear out. All I had to do was plug it into the USB port and install the program that I need to make the CD-G's.

Now if AOL would just FIX it's ongoing problem with Easy Designer so that those of us who have websites dependant upon it could get into our sites, I would be able to find out if I can use Vista to get into my web pages or whether I will still have to keep my old computer with Win2000 around just to maintain my website!!!!!

The rest of the stuff in Vista is a waste. If you are a home user or a small business user who doesn't NEED all the safety bells and whistles, Vista slows you down.
ndlicht: Vista Migration - Video Report (Thu, 12 Apr 2007 02:39:00 GMT)
Vista is horrible! I'm adept at using a PC and Vista is not at all intuitive. What was Mr. Gates thinking when his team overhauled XP?

The icons are different, the management is different, it was even difficult to figure out how to restart or shut down.

Wireless is the last to load and it seems unable to auto find what available. You have to fiddle with settings and you will not get it right. Programs get blocked and even if you say dont block at startup, its still blocked.

Get this Vista junk off my laptop and give me back XP.

ndl.
badbinary: Vista Migration - Video Report (Wed, 11 Apr 2007 23:00:51 GMT)
i still don't have a working driver for my photosmart 7150.

i definitely agree. unified driver architecture is a much better way to go.
Bruce: Vista Migration - Video Report (Wed, 11 Apr 2007 22:59:16 GMT)
QUOTE(badbinary @ 3:39pm Wed Apr 11 2007) [snapback]1351426[/snapback]

hp is giving very shoddy driver support for vista. i will never again buy another hp product.


Both my HP printers are 100% supported. It took about a month for full drivers to become available.

Personally I think they should do the same thing for windows that they do for Linux/Unix, that is create a unified driver and application that supports 1500+ different printer models.

The hpijs driver and hplip created by HP for the open source community supports around 1500 printers.
Join the Discussion

Note: It may take several minutes for new posts to appear here, and only the 20 most recent posts are shown. The complete thread is available on the forums.

ad

Home | Our Legal Stuff / Imprint | Privacy Policy | Press | Our Store | Link to Us

Testimonials | Customer Service | Support PC Pitstop | Printable Page